Senate Bill 331 becomes law

Small white puppy in puppy mill

Thank you to everyone who called, wrote, tweeted, and posted to try to stop Senate Bill 331.

Unfortunately, Senate Bill 331 was signed into law by Governor Kasich on December 19, 2016.  You can read the Columbus Dispatch article here.

If you want to know how your legislator voted, here’s the breakdown:

12/7/2016 House Vote

House Representatives that Voted For Senate Bill 331

A list of representatives that voted for Senate Bill 331

House Representatives that Voted Against Senate Bill 331

House Representatives that voted for Senate Bill 331

12/7/2016 Senate Vote

Senate Bill 331 - How each Ohio Senator Voted

If your legislator voted against this bill, please consider sending him/her a thank you note, and please keep speaking up!  Even though we didn’t win this one we need to keep being the voice for animals.  To quote an overused analogy, we didn’t win the battle, but we will keep fighting.  And, we believe in our hearts that we will win the war because ending puppy mills is the right thing to do for people and animals.

Thanks again for all that you do to help animals.

Senate Bill 331 is passed by the General Assembly

Senate Bill 331 passed the House and Senate and is on its way to Governor Kasich.  There is a silver lining for animal advocates, as both Senate Bill 195 and House Bill 215 were attached to this bill and will make bestiality illegal in Ohio and strengthen the penalties for cockfighting respectively.

The Columbus Dispatch provides a good summary of the additions to Senate Bill 331, and here’s the article confirming the bill passed and that the bill “helps out Petland.” Here are related articles from sources across Ohio regarding Senate Bill 331.

Here are related articles from sources across Ohio regarding Senate Bill 331.

Enquirer editorial board: Bill bad for puppies, bad for cities

The Enquirer editorial board joins the Cleveland Plain Dealer in opposition to Senate Bill 331.  Here’s an excerpt:

Animal rights advocates say it would be the weakest animal-protection law in the country. Even worse, it would take away local governments’ power to make their own, tougher laws meant to shut down puppy mill sales. Existing laws in Toledo and Grove City would be wiped off the books because, the bill says: “The regulation of pet stores is a matter of general statewide interest that requires statewide regulation.”

SB 331 is backed by Chillicothe-based pet store chain Petland, which objects to local laws such as Toledo’s banning retailers from selling dogs except those obtained from shelters or rescues. Regulations – not bans – are the answer to putting puppy mills out of business, Petland representatives contend.

That might be a more credible argument if the proposed regulations weren’t so weak.

But regardless, cities, villages and townships should retain the right to make their own laws on this issue, just as they can decide whether or not to ban certain breeds, for instance. They exist to serve the needs and reflect the values of their residents.

Both sides make their cases in op-eds. Check them out in the links above and then urge your state representative to vote against SB 331.

Please take the suggestion from the editorial board and contact your House Representative and politely ask that they oppose SB331.

HSUS and ASPCA Cincinnati Enquirer Editorial

Corey Roscoe, Ohio state director of the The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), and Vicki Deisner,Midwest legislative director of the American Society of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), teamed up to write an editorial in the Cincinnati Enquirer.  Here’s an excerpt:

Not only has Petland, the largest puppy-selling pet store chain in the nation, continued to obtain their dogs from puppy mills, they have also worked with members of the Ohio General Assembly to craft a bill that would strip local communities of their right to regulate pet stores at the local level, which would void existing ordinances in Grove City and Toledo and prevent any city in Ohio from regulating pet stores in the future. Local governments would no longer be able to enact humane policies that protect residents from being duped into supporting a cruel industry and protect them from buying a sick or behaviorally challenged puppy. Despite intense public outcry, SB 331 was hastily pushed through the Ohio Senate in May and will be heard soon in the House.

Read the entire editorial and contact your House Representative and politely ask that they oppose SB331.

Couple asks legislators to oppose Senate Bill 331 on Cincinnati.com

John and Barb Dorger, of Sycamore Township, write to Cincinnati.com asking for citizens to contact their legislators to oppose Senate Bill 331:

Puppy mill puppies are bred in inhumane conditions, with minimal USDA regulations, in which the adult dogs live their entire lives. Imagine not being able to stand up or turn around, and you get a picture of the type of conditions the dogs are subject to.

You can fight this cruelty by letting Gov. John Kasich, House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger and your state representative know that you oppose SB 331/HB 573. Your representative’s name can be found online at www.legislature.ohio.gov.

Read the complete letter here.

Animal Advocates hold press conference to oppose Senate Bill 331

 

Advocates against Senate Bill 331Advocates across the state spoke out against Senate bill Corey Roscoe, Ohio State Director of The Humane Society of the United States, Vicki Deisner of the ASPCA, Dr. Michelle Gonzalez of Rascal Animal Hospital in Dublin, Luke Westerman of the Westerman Family Foundation, Steffen Baldwin of ACT Ohio, and Janet Hoy of the Toledo Area Humane Society all shared their perspective on how the bill will be damaging to people and pets.

“(The bill) is an industry-backed effort that will not reform pet stores in any meaningful way,” Diesner said from the Statehouse steps Thursday. “Instead it will permit the continued importation of inhumanely bred puppy mill dogs into our communities.”

You can read the Dispatch coverage here.

You can see NBC4i’s coverage here.

You can read the Toledo Blade coverage here.

You can read WCPO (Cincinnati) here.